Course Offerings

Bishop England High School provides a rigorous academic program that is designed to prepare students for college level work. Most of our core courses are offered at three levels of instruction: Academic I, Academic II, and Honors/Advanced Placement (AP).  If a student excels in some areas more than others, the student will be placed into a combination of courses from different levels to accommodate the strengths of the student. View the course offerings by selecting from the tabs below.

Theology

*Denotes Semester Course

*OLD TESTAMENT (H-THEOLOGY 1-A):  The intention of this course is to give students a knowledge and appreciation of Sacred Scripture through the study of the Old Testament. Several fundamental concepts such as: revelation, inspiration, inerrancy, authorship, literary forms, and proper interpretation will be covered in the context of a larger study of the history and covenant theology of the Old Testament. The course requires outside reading, research, and both written and oral reports. Prerequisites: The student must be a freshman recommended for the Honors level by a placement committee.

*CATHOLIC DOCTRINE (H – THEOLOGY 1-B):  The goal of this semester course is concerned with providing students a foundation in the basic tenets of the Catholic faith. Emphasis will be placed on the New Testament Scriptures as the source of Catholic doctrine, the development of those doctrines throughout Christian history, as well as apologetic training aimed at helping students develop the ability to explain the doctrines of the Church to others. This course also includes age appropriate formation in Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body. The course requires outside reading, research, and both written and oral reports. Prerequisites: The student must be a freshman recommended for the Honors level by a placement committee.

*OLD TESTAMENT (AI – THEOLOGY 1-A): The purpose of this semester course is to give students a knowledge and appreciation of Sacred Scripture through a study of the Old Testament. Some basic concepts necessary for the proper study of Scripture such as: revelation, inspiration, proper interpretation, and covenant will be covered, as well as an overview of the history of the Old Testament. The course requires guided reading along with written and oral reports. Prerequisites:   The student must be a freshman recommended for the A1 level by a placement committee.

*THE112 CATHOLIC DOCTRINE (AI-THEOLOGY 1-B): The purpose of this semester course is concerned with providing students a foundation in the basic tenets of the Catholic faith. Emphasis will be placed on the New Testament Scriptures as the source of Catholic doctrine. This course also includes age appropriate formation in Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body. The course requires guided reading along with written and oral reports. Prerequisites: The student must be a freshman recommended for the AI level by a placement committee.

*OLD TESTAMENT (AII THEOLOGY 1-A):  The course will aim to give students a knowledge and appreciation of Sacred Scripture through a study of the Old Testament. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the fundamental history and stories of the Old Testament as the foundation of the New Testament, and practical application to living out the Catholic faith. Projects and activities associated with the content are provided throughout the year. Prerequisites: The student must be a freshman recommended for the AII level by a placement committee.

*CATHOLIC DOCTRINE (AII THEOLOGY 1-B)  This course is concerned with providing students a foundation in the basic tenets of the Catholic faith, and their practical application to the Christian life. This course also includes age appropriate formation in Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body. Projects and activities associated with the content are provided throughout the year. Prerequisites: The student must be a freshman recommended for the AII level by a placement committee.

*THE CHURCH AND ITS HISTORY (H -THEOLOGY 2 CH)The purpose of this semester course is to give students a background in the history of the Roman Catholic Church in Western Civilization, from Apostolic times to the present day. This historical view will include: the key figures and general conditions and movements of the different time periods, the controversies and councils related to Church doctrine, the Church’s ecclesiology, as well as contemporary issues in the Church today. Extensive reading and research are required. Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*WORLD RELIGIONS: CHRISTIANITY AND OTHER RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS (H -THEOLOGY 2 W)  This fast-paced one-semester course includes an in-depth study of the major world religions, both Eastern (Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Taoism, Confucianism, Jainism and Sikhism) and Western (Judaism, Islam, Mormonism and Christianity) particularly in comparison with Catholic Christianity.  The Gospel of John will be read to focus on the person and work of Jesus Christ. Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*THE CHURCH AND ITS HISTORY (AI -THEOLOGY 2 CH): The purpose of this semester course is to give students a background in the history of the Roman Catholic Church in Western Civilization, from Apostolic times to the present day. This historical view will include: the key figures and general conditions and movements of the different time periods, the controversies and councils related to Church doctrine, and the Church’s ecclesiology. Outside reading and periodic research are required.  Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*WORLD RELIGIONS: CHRISTIANITY AND OTHER RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS (AI – THEOLOGY 2 W) This one-semester course includes a survey of the major world religions, both Eastern (Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Taoism, Confucianism, Jainism and Sikhism) and Western (Judaism, Islam, Mormonism and Christianity) particularly in comparison to Catholic Christianity.  The Gospel of John will be read to focus on the person and work of Jesus Christ. Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*THE CHURCH AND ITS HISTORY (AII – THEOLOGY 2 CH): The purpose of this semester course is to give students a background in the history of the Roman Catholic Church in Western Civilization, from Apostolic times to the present day. This will include key figures and the general conditions and movements of the different time periods, as well as the Church’s ecclesiology. Guided research and outside activities associated with the curriculum are assigned throughout the year.  Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*WORLD RELIGIONS: CHRISTIANITY AND OTHER RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS (AII – THEOLOGY 2W)This one-semester course provides an introduction to the major world religions, both Eastern (Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Taoism, Confucianism, Jainism and Sikhism) and Western (Judaism, Islam, Mormonism and Christianity), particularly in comparison to Catholic Christianity.  The Gospel of John will be read to focus on the person and work of Jesus Christ. Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*NEW TESTAMENT: THE REVELATION OF CHRIST (H – THEOLOGY 3-A): The purpose of this semester course is to provide the student with an encounter with the person of Jesus Christ through the reading of the New Testament. This course will involve the use of typology and Covenant Theology, historical contextualization of the New Testament literature, primary source reading of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, and letters, as well as training in Lectio Divina prayer. Projects, papers, and oral presentations are assigned throughout the year.   Prerequisites:  The student must be a junior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*CHRISTIAN MORALITY (H – THEOLOGY 3-B): The purpose of this semester course is to provide the student with a rational and logical foundation for Christian moral teaching. This will include addressing the current climate of Moral Relativism, a formation in the traditional moral guides such as virtue, conscience, and the Natural Law, a contemporary look at topics today regarding the 5th and 6th Commandments, and a study of the saints as moral guides. Projects, papers, and oral presentations are assigned throughout the year. Prerequisites:  The student must be a junior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*NEW TESTAMENT: THE REVELATION OF CHRIST (AI – THEOLOGY 3-A): The purpose of this semester course is to provide the student with an encounter with the person of Jesus Christ through the reading of the New Testament. This course will involve a historical contextualization of the New Testament literature, and some primary source reading of the Gospels and Acts of the Apostles. Outside reading and research are assigned to aid the understanding of the Paschal Mystery.  Prerequisites:  The student must be a junior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*CHRISTIAN MORALITY (AI-THEOLOGY 3-B): The purpose of this semester course is to provide the student with a rational and logical foundation for Christian moral teaching. This will include addressing the current climate of Moral Relativism, a formation in the traditional moral guides such as virtue, conscience, and the Natural Law, and a contemporary look at topics today regarding the 5th and 6th Commandments. Outside reading and periodic research are required.  Prerequisites:  The student must be a junior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*NEW TESTAMENT: THE REVELATION OF CHRIST (AII – THEOLOGY 3-A): The purpose of this semester course is to provide the student with an encounter with the person of Jesus Christ through the reading of the New Testament. This course will involve some historical contextualization of the New Testament, as well as an overview of the central events of the Gospels. Guided research through periodic use of outside sources is assigned throughout the year.  Prerequisites:  The student must be a junior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*CHRISTIAN MORALITY (AII – THEOLOGY 3-B): The purpose of this semester course is to provide the student with a foundation in Christian moral teaching. This will include formation in the traditional moral guides such as virtue, conscience, and the Natural Law, with a particular emphasis on living morality in everyday situations, as well as a contemporary look at topics today regarding the 5th and 6th Commandments. Guided research through periodic use of outside sources is assigned throughout the year. Prerequisites:  The student must be a junior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*APOLOGETICS AND THE EXISTENCE OF GOD (H – THEOLOGY 4-A): The goal of this semester course is to help students to build a foundation for belief in Christianity through the understanding of the ways in which God has revealed himself in history. This will include a look at the philosophical proofs for God’s existence, the revelation of Christ in Scripture and Tradition, and the guiding role of the Magisterium throughout history. An in-depth look will be taken at the pertinent philosophical and scientific arguments surrounding the existence of God. Outside reading and research are required as well as accurate lecture notes and mastery of the subject matter. Prerequisites:  The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*THE SACRAMENTS (H – THEOLOGY 4-B):  The intention of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the important role of the Sacramental system within Catholic worship, theology, and life. Each Sacrament will be examined from a theological, practical, and historical perspective, with an emphasis on the historical development of the Sacraments and culminating in the most recent adaptations of the Sacraments after the Second Vatican Council. This course will also hit on topics such as the vocations to the priesthood and marriage, and John Paul II’s Theology of the Body. Outside reading and research are required as well as accurate lecture notes and mastery of the subject matter. Prerequisites:  The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*APOLOGETICS AND THE EXISTENCE OF GOD (AI – THEOLOGY 4-A):  In this course on apologetics, students will build a foundation for belief in Christianity through the understanding of the ways in which God has revealed himself in history. This will include a look at the philosophical proofs for God’s existence, the revelation of Christ in Scripture and Tradition, and the guiding role of the Magisterium throughout history. Outside reading is required as well as accurate lecture notes and mastery of the subject matter. Prerequisites: The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*THE SACRAMENTS (AI – THEOLOGY 4-B):  The aim of this semester course is to provide the student with an understanding of the important role of the Sacramental system within Catholic worship, theology, and life. Each Sacrament will be examined from a theological, practical, and historical perspective. This course will also hit on topics such as the vocations to the priesthood and marriage, and John Paul II’s Theology of the Body. Outside reading and periodic research are required. Prerequisites:  The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current theology teacher

*APOLOGETICS AND THE EXISTENCE OF GOD (AII – THEOLOGY 4-A): In this course, students will build a foundation for belief in Christianity through the understanding of the ways in which God has revealed himself in history. This will include a look at the philosophical proofs for God’s existence, the revelation of Christ in Scripture and Tradition, and the guiding role of the Magisterium throughout history. Emphasis will be placed on the story of Salvation History. Projects and activities associated with the content are assigned throughout the year. Prerequisites:  The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*THE SACRAMENTS (AII – THEOLOGY 4-B):  This course will provide the student with an understanding of the important role of the Sacramental system within Catholic worship, theology, and life. Each Sacrament will be examined from a practical perspective of real-life participation in the life of the Church. Projects and activities associated with the content are assigned throughout the year. Prerequisites:  The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current theology teacher.

*TOLKIEN AND LEWIS H: This one-semester course will investigate the lives and ideas of two of the Twentieth Century’s most famous Christian writers while exploring their friendship and reading two of their important works.  Extensive reading is required. Prerequisites:  Enrollment is open to juniors and seniors who have the approval of the current theology teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

 *THE GREAT DEBATES OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY H: This is an introductory semester course in Western philosophy. Students will be introduced to the major philosophical figures, and the questions they raised, beginning in Ancient Greece and continuing through the major stages of Western Civilization until today. The course will also include Socratic seminar and class debates based on these major philosophical questions. Students should feel comfortable sharing their thoughts and opinions verbally. Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors who have the approval of Mr. Beach (room 237A). Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

 

English

*Denotes semester course.

ENGLISH I H: In this challenging full-year course, students will study a variety of genres in fiction as well as selections in non-fiction while developing strong analytical skills with increasingly complex texts. Students will learn how to provide strong textual support for a thesis and draw inferences from a text. Writing skills and conventions will be practiced and reinforced as well as students’ verbal skills. Research will be used by students to create a thesis paper and oral presentations, including an informative speech that will combine research skills with their experience doing service work.Prerequisites: Successful completion of eighth-grade English and recommendation for Honors level by the placement committee.

*RESEARCH & STUDY SKILLS H: This semester course focuses on the development of critical thinking skills through the writing process. The course culminates in an MLA-style research paper. Students will combine research skills with their experience in a service organization. They will select a topic of concern for their community, nation or the world and research the nature of the concern and how at least one organization makes a difference. While in the process of researching their respective topics, students must engage in at least ten hours of service with the organization they choose with the instructor’s approval. Once the paper is completed, students will develop a persuasive speech in support of the organization or form of service they selected for this semester. This course includes a brief introduction to Microsoft Office 365.  Prerequisites: Ninth grade Honors students who already have and English I credit are enrolled in this course along with Honors Composition.

ENGLISH I AI: This course is designed to develop improved grammar/language skills, to broaden vocabulary, and to increase competency in reading, speaking, and writing. Included is an introduction to major literary genres. Prerequisites: Successful completion of eighth-grade English and recommendation for AI level by the placement committee.

*RESEARCH/STUDY SKILLS AI: This semester course begins with the development of the study and test-taking skills needed for high school success. The course culminates in an MLA-style research paper. Students will combine research skills with their experience in a service organization. They will select a topic of concern for their community, nation or the world and research the nature of the concern and how at least one organization makes a difference. While in the process of researching their respective topics, students must engage in at least ten hours of service with the organization they choose with the instructor’s approval. Once the paper is completed, students will present their findings to the class.This course includes a brief introduction to Microsoft Office 365. Prerequisites: Successful completion of eighth-grade English and recommendation for AI level by the placement committee.

ENGLISH I AII: This course emphasizes the mastery of fundamental English language skills.  Basic grammar, vocabulary usage, library use, and literature for enrichment are included. Included is an introduction to major literary genres. Prerequisites: Successful completion of eighth-grade English and recommendation for AII level by the placement committee.

*RESEARCH/STUDY SKILLS AII: This semester course begins with an introduction to Microsoft Office 365 and the development of the study and test-taking skills needed for high school success. Students are taken step by step through the stages of creating a research paper, combining research with their experience doing service work. Once the paper is completed, students will share what they have learned with the class. This course includes a brief introduction to Microsoft Office 365. Prerequisites: Successful completion of eighth-grade English; placement in English I AII.

ENGLISH II H: This course in world literature prepares students for college by developing language skills through composition, vocabulary, and the reading and analysis of selections from world literature with an emphasis on the masterpieces of world literature. A course requirement is completion (with revisions if necessary) of a research paper that meets department standards. The research topic will be selected by the student (subject to approval by the teacher). The student will also complete at least one oral presentation to the class. Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and approval of current English teacher.

ENGLISH II AI:  This course in world literature continues to develop students’ language skills through a focus on composition skills and literary analysis. Throughout the course, differences in writing purposes and techniques are emphasized. During a study of world literature, a deeper examination of literary genres builds on the foundations from English I. Some student products include formal essays, a research component, and an informal speech. Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and approval of current English teacher.

ENGLISH II AII: The purpose of this world literature course is to strengthen language skills. Participation in a variety of language-related activities, including continued vocabulary study, is required. During a study of world literature, literary types are studied. Also included in the course are book reviews, formal essays, an informal speech, and a research component. Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and approval of the current English teacher.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (ENGLISH III): The Advanced Placement course in language and composition is a rhetoric-based, college-level course designed to help students become both skilled readers of primarily nonfiction prose styles and skilled writers of formal and informal essays. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the persuasive tools of an author (e.g., diction, tone, voice, sentence structure) and on being able to compose, both in and out of class, essays analyzing the use of such tools in persuading an audience. In keeping with the AP Language and Composition trends, the course will include a required research component, the completion of which will allow students to formulate, polish, and deliver informed arguments. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class. Prerequisites: Successful completion of English II and approval of the current English teacher. Recommendation for Advanced Placement English is based on a demonstrated ability to do college-level work.

ENGLISH III AI: This course is designed to help students learn to read a variety of texts from throughout the literary world with insight and to write about them with skill and understanding. To that end, students will be provided with instruction and feedback to help them advance as effective writers and as thoughtful readers and researchers. Students will learn approaches to close reading and textual analysis and will practice developing ideas into fully developed analytical essays, through a process of drafting, revision, and editing. By the end of the year, students should feel more confident about their ability to engage with and analyze challenging texts, both fiction and non-fiction—as well as their ability to write clear, thoughtful, well-argued academic papers. Prerequisites: Successful completion of English II and approval of the current English teacher.

ENGLISH III AII: This course is designed to allow students to work to their optimum levels by offering direct instruction in skills and strategies, multiple modalities for learning opportunities and assessments, and built-in structures and support for long-term assignments. The environment encourages independence and autonomy. Students learn to read a variety of texts from throughout the literary world with insight and to write about them with skill and understanding. To that end, students will be provided with instruction and feedback to help them advance as effective writers and as thoughtful readers and researchers. Students will learn approaches to close reading and textual analysis and will practice developing ideas into fully-developed analytical essays, through a process of drafting, revision, and editing. By the end of the year, students should feel more confident about their ability to engage with and analyze challenging texts, both fiction and non-fiction—as well as their ability to write clear, thoughtful, well-argued academic papers. Prerequisites:  Successful completion of English II and approval of current English teacher.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (ENGLISH IV): The Advanced Placement English course in literature and composition is a college-level course designed to develop skills in critical reading, higher-level thinking, and writing about literature. Students read a variety of challenging prose and poetry, engage in critical analysis, and write essays based on the works read. Most class time is devoted to class and small group discussions of literature. Reading is done primarily out of class, but writing assignments may be out of class, in-class prepared, or in-class extemporaneous. Prerequisites: Successful completion of English III and approval of the current English teacher. Recommendation for Advanced Placement English is based on a demonstrated ability to do college-level work.

ENGLISH IV AI: This course builds on English III to prepare students for the reading and writing they will do in future college courses and beyond. While English III honed students’ ability to critically read and closely analyze literary texts, English IV adds an additional emphasis on helping students to write well-reasoned argumentative papers that draw on multiple viewpoints and sources, both literary and informative. During the year, students will learn to identify the elements of an effective argument, and then apply those principles in composing researched essays about academic and public issues. This course will also strengthen students’ information literacy skills by teaching strategies for finding, assessing, using, citing, and documenting source materials. Students will learn these writing and research skills through frequent, intensive practice, so that by the end of the year, they will be able to write logically, responsibly, and articulately about challenging topics. Prerequisites: Successful completion of English III and approval of the current English teacher.

ENGLISH IV AII: This course builds on English III to prepare students for the reading and writing they will do in future college courses and beyond. While English III honed students’ ability to critically read and closely analyze literary texts, English IV adds an additional emphasis on helping students to write well-reasoned argumentative papers that draw on multiple viewpoints and sources, both literary and informative. During the year, students will learn to identify the elements of an effective argument, and then apply those principles in composing researched essays about academic and public issues.  This course will also strengthen students’ information literacy skills by teaching strategies for finding, assessing, using, citing, and documenting source materials. This course will provide an environment designed to help them reach their optimum levels by offering direct instruction in skills and strategies, multiple modalities for learning opportunities and assessments, and built-in structures and support for long-term assignments. The environment encourages independence and autonomy. Prerequisites:  Successful completion of English III and approval of current English teacher.

*CREATIVE WRITING H: During this semester course, students will participate in workshop activities that will stimulate the creative writing of prose fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction.Prerequisites: Enrollment is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with the approval of the current English teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class. 

*COMPOSITION AI: This semester course will provide students with a variety of in-class writing experiences in order to strengthen communication skills required in academic courses and college entrance tests and applications. Composition of the thesis essay will be prominent among student activities, along with the improving of thinking, writing, and speaking skills. In addition, the course will emphasize the effective use of language as well as grammatical and mechanical writing skills. Prerequisites: Open to freshmen with the approval of the placement committee and to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors with the approval of the current English teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*COMPOSITION H: This semester course will provide students with a variety of in-class writing experiences in order to strengthen communication skills required in both high school and college-level academic courses and college entrance tests and applications. Composition of the thesis essay will be prominent among student activities, along with the improving of higher-level thinking, writing, and speaking skills. In addition, the course will emphasize the effective use of language as well as grammatical and mechanical writing skills.  Prerequisites: Open to freshmen with the approval of the placement committee and to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors with the approval of the current English teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC SPEAKING AI: This semester course provides students with an introduction to public speaking, terminology, basic skills, and techniques for making oral presentations and different types of speeches. The course will offer ample opportunities for the beginning speaker to stand in front of a live audience and present his/her practiced performance. Students will develop the skills of articulation, relevant argument, poise, and presence through repeated experience in practice and performance. Students will learn about the role of communication in our lives, the communication model, spatial relationships, delivery styles, and the effectiveness of language, gestures, and organization techniques. As they gain knowledge and experience, students will gain confidence in their public speaking capabilities. Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with the approval of their current English teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fine Arts

The Fine Arts department offers a variety of introductory and advanced courses in visual arts, theatre, and music. Students who have training or a high school credit outside of Bishop England in one of these areas of fine arts may be eligible to enroll in an advanced course. New students should contact the department chair, Ashlan Stephenson (astephenson@behs.com) for more information.

*INTRODUCTION TO ART AI: This course presents an introduction to the world of visual arts through drawing and the elements and principles of design. The student will learn about art by producing art. Emphasis will be placed on drawing and the elements of design. Technical skills are developed through studio work, using a variety of media: graphite, charcoal and colored pencils. Students will exhibit their work to the school community. Students who display a high degree of talent and task commitment in this course will be considered for Honors level visual arts courses at the end of the semester. Note: if a student has earned a high school credit in art, he or she is eligible to enroll in another visual arts class; however, Honors level courses require approval from the instructor, Mrs. Johnson (ajohnson@behs.com). Prerequisites: None. (No teacher signature required.)

*DRAWING AI: This semester course follows Introduction to Art. Students will improve their technical skills through studio work, using a variety of drawing media. Students will demonstrate the use of the elements and principles of art, with special emphasis on the elements of line, value and space, form and texture. Units of study will include still life, relief printmaking, the human figure, fantasy and landscape. Student critiques and class discussion of master artists and art movements are included. Students will exhibit their work to the school community. Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed Introduction to Art and must have the approval of Ms. Johnson, room 101C. Students may sign up for Introduction to Art and Drawing during the same year, with approval of the course instructor. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*DRAWING H: In this one-semester course, the student’s creativity will be challenged by more complex problems in drawing and composition, including illustration, mark making, creating a complex visual space, engagement with the drawing surface and use of space and perspective. Different approaches such as rendering (through pencil shading), gesture, expression, and abstraction will be explored with the goal of developing an independent project around an approach and subject matter chosen by the student. A variety of wet and dry drawing media will be used in this course. Students will maintain a sketchbook throughout the course. Students will participate in peer critiques, and they will research select artists or periods of art to inform their connection to the visual medium of drawing. Each student will enter one approved contest during the course and will exhibit their work to the school community. Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed Introduction to Art and have the approval of Ms. Johnson, room 101C. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student will is not permitted to drop the class.

*CERAMICS H: Students will acquire knowledge of hand-building and wheel-throwing techniques through the production of clay forms. Students will fire and glaze each piece they create. Study of the chemistry of ceramics is included. The ability to work independently is an expectation in this course. Students are required to attend after school open studio on a regular basis throughout the course. Students will draw and design each project in a sketchbook. Students will exhibit their work to the school community, and they will enter their work in one art contest during the semester. Prerequisites: Students must be recommended for this course by Ms. Johnson, room 101C. To be eligible, students must have completed Introduction to Art and/or Drawing and must display a high degree of creativity. The student must be proficient in producing art and must demonstrate a high level of talent and task commitment. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*PAINTING H: Students will advance in the study of acrylic painting and other painting media. Studio projects will focus on observation and representation as well as fantasy and creativity from photographs. Students will develop at least one independent study painting or drawing using their own initiative and design. Emphasis will be placed on the principles of design, painting techniques, color and craftsmanship. Study of art history will increase the students’ knowledge of an artistic heritage. Students are expected to improve their drawing skills by maintaining a sketchbook. Students will exhibit their work to the school community, and they will enter their work in one art contest during the semester. Prerequisites: Students must be recommended for this course by Ms. Johnson, room 101C. To be eligible, students must have completed Introduction to Art and/or Drawing and must display a high degree of creativity. The student must be proficient in producing art and must demonstrate a high level of talent and task commitment. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

AP Drawing and AP 2-D Art and Design: The student enrolled in the course will produce a portfolio of at least twenty works, including a concentration in an independent theme of study, as outlined in the College Board Advanced Placement course and exam description. Students will maintain an extensive sketchbook and will prepare at least four works for the portfolio during the summer preceding the course. Students will participate in and will lead peer critiques, and they will research select artists and art movements for class discussion. Through studio practice, application of design concepts and informed decision making, all students will assemble a body of art that demonstrates a high level of quality and growth over time of content, technique and process. Students will select a portfolio for completion, either Drawing or 2-D Art and Design. Through the ongoing creative process, students will develop mastery in concept, composition and execution. Students will focus on mastery of art technique and composition in five works, and they will focus on sustained investigation of a student-generated theme in fifteen digital images of sketches and completed works to document the investigation. An art exhibit during the second semester gives the students the opportunity to demonstrate their accomplishments to the school community. Each student must enter their work in at least one art contest per semester. *Students who enroll in this course will be expected to attend an extended session of class each time the class rotates to the last period of the day. Students will be dismissed at 3:35 Monday through Friday of that week.  Prerequisites: To be eligible, the student must be highly self-motivated, must have completed Painting and must have the approval of Ms. Johnson, room 101C. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN AP DRAWING AND 2-D ART & DESIGN MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE FOUR ART ASSIGNMENTS PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK AS FOUR MAJOR GRADES DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL.

 *DIGITAL ART AND DESIGN 1 – AIThis course focuses on the development of basic concepts, ideas, skills and techniques for design, color and typography utilizing professional practices and procedures. Students will use the computer as a graphics tool as well as traditional layout device. Students will gain an understanding of all production processes as it relates to printed materials. This course also provides the student with an understanding of visual problem solving from the concept stage through the finished product stage.  Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (No teacher signature required.)

*DIGITAL ART AND DESIGN 2 – AI: This course will be the natural progression of Digital Art and Design 1 as it continues the fundamental idea of using computer technology to produce an artistic image. Students will further advance their computer illustration techniques, image manipulation, digital camera use, graphic design knowledge, art history concepts, visual literacy and the principles and elements of art in composition by running and managing an in-house print shop. Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors who have completed Digital Art and Design I. (See Mr. Traeger, 207B, for approval.)

*CHAMBER CHOIR H (SEMESTER) OR CHAMBER CHOIR H (Year): This course, which may be taken for a single semester or a full year, will focus on choral technique, sight reading and musicianship skills. Students will learn by performing choral pieces from various genres of music. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of singing, vocal production, music reading and performance skills. Concerts and school functions requiring vocal music will take place throughout the course and are required. After-school rehearsals will be held for select events. Students will be required to participate in a performance at the end of the semester in place of an exam. All students will be required to purchase concert apparel-for all courses. Note that students may sign up for this course more than once. Prerequisites: Students must have the approval of Mr. Gerber, 164C.  Interested freshmen or other students who have not taken a choral class at BEHS must audition for this class. Contact Mr. Tom Gerber (tgerber@behs.com).

*CHORALE AI/H (SEMESTER) OR CHORALE AI/H (YEAR): This course, which may be taken for a single semester or for a full year, is designed to introduce interested students to the BE choral program and will present an overview of choral singing through rehearsal and performance activities and through the presentation of music theory fundamentals. Students will learn by performing choral pieces from various genres of music. Emphasis will be placed on fundamentals of singing, vocal production, music reading and performance skills. Concerts and school functions requiring vocal music will take place throughout the course and are required. After-school rehearsals will be held for select events. Students will be required to participate in a performance at the end of the semester in place of an exam. No previous vocal or musical training is required. All students will be required to purchase concert apparel. Extracurricular choral activities may be offered on a volunteer basis during the course. Prerequisites: Students wishing to enroll for Honors credit must have the approval of Mr. Gerber, 164C upon a successful vocal audition. There is no prerequisite for Chorale A1. (No teacher signature required for AI Chorale.) 

 *WOMEN’S CHORUS H/AI (Semester) OR *WOMEN’S CHORUS H\AI (Year): This course, which may be taken for a single semester or a full year, students who have been in a BE choral class before will focus on advancing their choral technique, sight reading, and musicianship skills. Students will learn by performing choral pieces from various genres of music. Concerts and school functions requiring vocal music will take place throughout the course and are required. After-school rehearsals will be held for select events. Students will be required to participate in a performance at the end of the semester in place of an exam. All students will be required to purchase concert apparel-for all courses. Note that students may sign up for this course more than once. Prerequisites: Students must have the approval of Mr. Gerber, 164C and must have had a choral class at BEHS prior to this class. Students accepted for Honors credit must audition.

*MUSIC THROUGH THE AGES AI: This course presents a survey of music repertoire beginning with J.S. Bach and working its way towards modern day. Students will form an understanding of the different styles/ genres of music and the eras within which the music operated. Students will also gain musical vocabulary and will apply it to listening examples from each composer covered. The goal is to create a chronology of composers and their works in order to see the progression of music through the ages. Students will have daily discussion of the material covered and its significance in helping to advance music. Students will have the opportunity to listen and to analyze many different styles of music, and they will be able to differentiate between the many genres of Western Music. Prerequisites: None. (No teacher signature required.)

*MUSIC THROUGH THE AGES H: This semester course will be an in-depth study of music beginning in Antiquity and ending in Contemporary/Modern Day music. Students will study major composers and music pieces of each time period through oral and written analysis. Students will be able to have in-depth and analytical discussions of the music we will cover. The course will include the historical context and major events that may have influenced the music of that time. Students will be able to recognize successfully and to analyze music of many genres. Students also will be able to differentiate between the different musical time periods, including Antiquity, Medieval, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Contemporary and Modern Day. Throughout the course students will be challenged to differentiate music not only by melody and harmony, but also they will differentiate by form and the compositional techniques used during each specific musical era. Prerequisites: The student must be recommended for Honors level social studies, and they must have the approval of Mr. Gerber, 164C. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*THEATRE I AI (Formerly Drama I): This course presents a foundation of skills for students to develop a comfort level when speaking and performing in front of others. The students will explore the various skills needed to build a framework for performing onstage. Through group projects and presentations, the student will start hands-on involvement in every aspect of theater. From stage craft design to publicity and improvisation to scene work, students will gain a working knowledge of the theatre world. Prerequisites: None. (No teacher signature required.)

*THEATRE II AI (Formerly Drama II): This semester course will build on the skills acquired in Drama I. Study will include in-depth acting exercises and important dramatic works. Students also will begin a study of playwriting and directing. Students will rotate through a variety of roles, including working as a production team. Students will produce a number of monologues, scenes, and other projects, making their own artistic decisions for each step. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Drama I and approval of the student’s Drama I teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*MUSICAL THEATRE H: This semester course is for the student who is interested in musical theatre- both onstage and “behind the scenes.” Students will have the opportunity to rehearse, perform, direct and choreograph/stage various scenes from shows in the Broadway genre. All students are expected to both perform and direct/produce. Performances will be both in-class and “main-stage” productions. The final project will be a performance of the scenes and will be outside of class at the end of the semester. This class will be offered in alternating years: 2020-21 and again in 2022-23.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of Drama I or Chorus at BEHS and the approval of Ms. Stephenson. If those classes have not been taken at BEHS, the student must audition to take the class. See Mr. Gerber (164C) or Ms. Stephenson (109D). Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*FAD332 ADVANCED DRAMA H: This advanced course is designed for students who have a high level of interest in theatre and who have participated in Bishop England theatrical productions and/or regional or community theatre. Study will include reading and evaluating popular classic and contemporary plays, research and performance of musical theatre scenes, and preparing for a career in theatre and film. There will be a final performance of a complete one-act play or a series of ten-minute plays that is chosen, produced, directed, and acted by the class. This class will be offered in alternating years:  in 2019-20 and again in 2021-22. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Drama II (or other advanced drama programs) and approval of the student’s Drama I or Drama II instructor. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*SHAKESPEARE IN ACTION H: This semester course offers students an opportunity to focus on a specific part of theatre and literature. It will give students a chance to explore and create an art form in an area that would constitute only a unit of study in a survey English or theatre class.  This class will appeal to students who want to explore the acting perspective of Shakespeare’s comedies and tragedies. This course is also an excellent class to take prior to Advanced Drama, which will be offered in 2021-2022. This class will be offered in alternating years, 2020-21. It will be offered again 2022-23. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Drama II (or other advanced drama programs) and approval of the student’s Drama I or Drama II instructor. This class is open to students grades 10-12. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class. 

Mathematics

All math courses require the completion of summer review work. Information regarding this work is posted on the BEHS website at the beginning of the summer. Assessments based on this work will be given at the beginning of the school year in each course.

 ALGEBRA I AI: This course develops the essential concepts of operations with signed numbers, equation solving, graphing, polynomials, rules of exponents, and radicals. The intent of this course is to lay the groundwork for higher mathematics. Prerequisites: Recommendation for AI level by the placement committee.

ALGEBRA I AII: This course is a guided approach to essential algebraic concepts. Topics include algebraic expressions, equations, rational numbers, proportions, percent, linear equations, inequalities, polynomials, factoring, and radical expressions. Prerequisites: Recommendation for AII level by the placement committee.

GEOMETRY H: This course places an emphasis on the development of an organized mathematical system that relates the study of geometry to the student’s knowledge of algebra. Students will be actively involved in a logical, sequential development of geometry and will be expected to develop skills necessary to master the process of deductive reasoning as well as the application of geometric principles. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and the recommendation for Honors level by the placement committee or by the current math teacher.

GEOMETRY AI: The essential characteristics of an abstract mathematical system are explored through the process of deductive reasoning. The study of systems in two and three dimensions encourages students to think carefully and creatively while enhancing their spatial visualization skills. Note: A basic scientific calculator will be used periodically during the year. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I AI and approval of the current math teacher or placement committee.

GEOMETRY AII: Students will study polygons, perimeter, area, volume, congruent and similar figures, special right triangles, parallel lines, and the coordinate plane using deductive reasoning. Note: A basic scientific calculator should be used throughout the year in class and for homework. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and approval of the current math teacher.        

ALGEBRA II H: Topics include polynomial operations, coordinate geometry, rational expressions and exponents, matrices, quadratic equations, and logarithms. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus CE  graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Geometry H and approval of the current math teacher.

ALGEBRA II AI: This course builds upon the skills learned in Algebra I AI. The basic topics studied during this year include polynomials, factoring, coordinate geometry, relations, functions, quadratic equations, rational expressions, and real exponents. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I AI and Geometry AI and approval of the current math teacher. Special consideration will be given, upon the recommendation of the instructor and the Math Department chairperson, to those qualified students who wish to take this course concurrently with Geometry AI.

 ALGEBRA II AII: This course builds upon the skills learned in Algebra I AII. The basic topics include equation solving, relations and functions, systems of equations, polynomials, factoring, radical equations, and quadratic functions. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry and approval by the current math teacher.

ALGEBRA III AND TRIGONOMETRY AI: Topics included in this course are polynomials, functions and relations, equation and inequality solving, graphing, exponents, logarithms, circular functions, and trigonometry. THIS COURSE IS NOT A PREPARATION FOR CALCULUS. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition or a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II AI and approval of the current math teacher.

ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY AII: This course builds upon the skills learned in Algebra II AII. Topics include factoring, linear and quadratic functions, higher degree polynomials, rational functions, logarithms, exponents, and trigonometry. There is extensive work with a graphing calculator. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition or a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II and Geometry and approval of the current math teacher.

 PRE-CALCULUS H: This course covers an in-depth study of trigonometry and circular functions, basic graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, sequences, series, limits, and an introduction to differential calculus. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition or a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II H and the approval of the current math teacher.

PRE-CALCULUS AI: Topics include trigonometry and applications, circular functions, algebra review, higher degree polynomials, basic graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and limits. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition or a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II and approval of the current math teacher.

CALCULUS H: This course builds upon the skills learned in Pre-Calculus. Topics include the algebra of functions, limits, continuity, the derivative and applications, anti-derivatives, and the definite integral. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition or a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Pre–Calculus and approval of the current math teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*FOR AP CALCULUS AND STATS CLASSES LISTED BELOW, STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO ATTEND EXTENDED CLASS SESSIONS AFTER SCHOOL WHEN THE CLASS IS THE LAST PERIOD OF THE DAY, AT THE TEACHER’S DISCRETION.

CALCULUS AB – AP: This advanced placement course is a study of elementary functions, differential and integral calculus. Topics covered include limits, continuity, the derivative and applications, anti-derivatives and applications, techniques of integration, and the definite integral and applications. This course is a good choice for those students considering a major in mathematics, science, engineering, economics, or the actuarial sciences. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition or a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus and approval of the current math teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

CALCULUS BC — AP: Calculus BC is an intensive Advanced Placement course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. In addition to the topics covered in Calculus AB, this course includes topics such as infinite series and differential equations. This course is a good choice for those students considering a major in mathematics, science, engineering, economics, or the actuarial sciences. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition or a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus H and approval of the current math teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

STATISTICS – AP The AP Statistics course is an introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding. This course is a good choice for those students considering a major in pre-professional health studies. NOTE: Student is required to have a TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition or a TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator. Prerequisites:  Students are eligible for consideration if they are currently enrolled in Honors Pre-Calculus and performing well or they are approved to take Honors Pre-Calculus next year. Students who are currently taking AI Pre-Calculus and are doing extremely well are also eligible for consideration. The current math teacher must approve enrollment in AP Statistics.. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

Physical Education

*PHYSICAL EDUCATION FALL SEMESTER A1 (MALES)       *PHYSICAL EDUCATION SPRING SEMESTER AI (MALES): This course consists of basic fundamentals of various team, recreational, lifetime, and individual sports.  Basic physical fitness testing is initiated at the beginning and end of the school year to assess overall improvement in physical fitness.  Specific issues relating to healthier living and character building will be included in the overall program.  Typically, students enroll in these courses in the sophomore year to satisfy the requirement for one Carnegie unit of credit in physical education. Prerequisite: No teacher signature required.                                                                     

* PHYSICAL EDUCATION FALL SEMESTER AI (FEMALES)  *PHYSICAL EDUCATION SPRING SEMESTER AI (FEMALES): This course consists of basic fundamentals of various team, recreational, lifetime, and individual sports.  Basic physical fitness testing is initiated at the beginning and end of the school year to assess overall improvement in physical fitness.  Specific issues relating to healthier living and character building will be included in the overall program.  Typically, students enroll in these courses in the sophomore year to satisfy the requirement for one Carnegie unit of credit in physical education. Prerequisite: No teacher signature required.

*NUTRITION & HEALTH AI: This interactive course provides in-depth coverage and practical application of mind/body health-related topics impacting today’s teenager. These topics include: nutrition and physical fitness; mental health and self-esteem; technology for total wellness; substance abuse, including athletes’ use of steroids; and learning techniques for dealing with stress and the pressures facing teenagers today. This course does not count toward the required physical education credit.  Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. No teacher signature required. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*WEIGHT TRAINING & FITNESS AI (MALES): This semester course consists of the fundamentals of weight training, conditioning, and nutrition necessary for male total body development. Basic strength and cardiovascular endurance testing will be done at the beginning and end of each semester to assess overall improvement. Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior boys. No teacher signature required. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*WEIGHT TRAINING & FITNESS AI (FEMALES): This semester course consists of the fundamentals of weight training, conditioning, and nutrition specific to female total body development. Emphasis is also placed on self-imaging issues regarding women today. Basic strength and cardiovascular endurance testing will be done at the beginning and end of each semester to assess overall improvement. Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior girls. No teacher signature required. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

Science

BIOLOGY H: This course is designed to provide students with detailed knowledge of the central concepts and principles of biology. Topic areas include cell structure and function, organic chemistry, respiration, photosynthesis, DNA, genetics, structure and function of animals, and vertebrate studies with an emphasis on humans. Laboratory exercises are correlated with these topics, and out-of-class research on various projects is required. Prerequisites: Recommendation for Honors level by the placement committee.

BIOLOGY AI: This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the fundamental principles of life function and forms. Topics include cell structure and function, DNA, genetics, and vertebrate organ systems with an emphasis on humans. Laboratory exercises are correlated with these topics. Prerequisites: Recommendation for AI level by the placement committee.

BIOLOGY AII: This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to life science. Topics include cell structure and function, multi-cellular organisms, DNA, genetics, a survey of human systems, and ecology. Laboratory exercises are correlated with these topics. Prerequisites: Recommendation for AII level by the placement committee.

BIOLOGY II AI: This course serves as a continuation of Biology I. The course will include a more in-depth study and application of topics such as the diversity of life, bacteria, protists, fungi, invertebrates, plant life, and ecological interactions and evolution. Students will be required to complete an assignment each quarter that involves Internet research and computer applications. Prerequisites: Successful completion of AI or Honors Biology and AI or Honors Chemistry and the approval of the current science teacher. Please note that students will not be permitted to take Biology II if they have already taken Biology II AP.

AP BIOLOGY: This course provides an in-depth study of topics which include basic and organic chemistry as related to biology; cells and sub-cellular organization; the cell cycle; cell-to-cell communication; cellular respiration and photosynthesis; heredity and genetics; DNA science, molecular genetics and gene regulation; theories, evidence, and mechanics of evolution; and ecology, communities, and ecosystems. This course is designed to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement exam given in May. *Students who enroll in this course will be expected to attend an extended session of class each time the class rotates to the last period of the day.  Students will be dismissed at 3:35 Monday through Friday of that week in order to complete the lab work that is required for an AP course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry and Biology and the approval of Dr. Hellstrom, room 167A. Students are placed in AP Biology based on demonstrated ability to do college-level work. Please note that students will not be permitted to take AP Biology if they have already taken Biology II AI.

NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN AP BIOLOGY MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE A PACKET OF COURSE WORK OVER THE SUMMER (THE EQUIVALENT OF ABOUT FIVE HOURS OF READING AND STUDYING), PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK THROUGH ASSESSMENT DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL AS WELL AS ON THE MIDTERM EXAM.

CHEMISTRY H: Concepts include an in-depth investigation of the elements, their interactions with each other, and the transformations of matter as a result of energy changes. Laboratory investigations are correlated with these concepts. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology H or its equivalent and the approval of the current science teacher. Students should be recommended for Honors level math.

AP CHEMISTRY (DOUBLE PERIOD): Chemistry AP is an intense inquiry-based laboratory course in the study of the structure and properties of matter and the changes that matter undergoes.  In addition to building upon the concepts taught in the first year of chemistry, expanded emphasis will be placed on thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, solubility, and electrochemistry. This course is designed to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement exam given in May. *Students taking this course will be enrolled in two consecutive class periods of AP Chemistry to complete the lab work that is required for an AP science course. Note that this class is typically offered in alternating years. It will be offered in 2020-21 and again in 2022-23. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry and the approval of the Mr. Pridgen, room 103B. Students are placed in AP Chemistry based on demonstrated ability to do college-level work. 

NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN CHEMISTRY AP MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE A PACKET OF COURSE WORK OVER THE SUMMER (THE EQUIVALENT OF ABOUT FIVE HOURS OF READING AND STUDYING), PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK THROUGH ASSESSMENT DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL AS WELL AS ON THE MIDTERM EXAM.

CHEMISTRY AI: This course is a complete investigation of the elements and their interactions with each other. Laboratory investigations are correlated with these topics. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and Biology H or Biology AI and the approval of the current science teacher.

CHEMISTRY AII: This course is designed to help students realize the important role that chemistry plays in everyday life. Chemistry concepts are presented utilizing decision-making and problem-solving skills as well as laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and approval of the current science teacher.

PHYSICS H: The course investigates the effects of energy and matter in the dynamic changes that nature undergoes. Laboratory investigations and individual research projects supplement learning objectives. Major topics include mechanics of linear and periodic motion, forces, vectors, energy and simple machines. Usage of current physics software is incorporated into the studies. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II and Chemistry H or Chemistry AI as well as the approval of the current science teacher. Students should be recommended for Honors level math. It is strongly recommended that the student be enrolled in Pre-Calculus or a higher-level math course.

PHYSICS II  H: This lecture and laboratory based class covers waves, sound, light, optics, magnetism, electricity, quantum and string theory as well as nuclear physics. Students will continue their studies in the same textbook as used in Physics H. Prerequisites: Successful completion Honors Physics. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

PHYSICS AI: This course investigates the effects of energy and matter in the dynamic changes that nature undergoes. Major topics include mechanics of linear and periodic motion, forces, vectors, energy and simple machines. Laboratory investigations and individual projects supplement course materials. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry AI and at least an 80 average in Algebra II as well as the approval of the current science teacher.

PHYSICS II AI : This course applies the concepts learned in AI Physics to waves, sound, light, and optics, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear physics. Students will continue their studies in the same textbook as used in Physics AI. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Physics AI and the approval of the current science teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: This course is an interdisciplinary course that embraces a wide variety of science topics including biology, chemistry, earth science, geography, geology, and environmental studies. Students will study the interactions of the natural world including earth systems, resources, population, land use, pollution, and global change. Students will identify human and man-made environmental problems as well as the risks associated with them and examine ideas to prevent the problems. Laboratory and field activities will be performed to enhance data collection, analysis, and understanding. This course is designed to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement exam given in May. *Students who enroll in this course will be expected to attend an extended session of class each time the class rotates to the last period of the day. Students will be dismissed at 3:35 Monday through Friday of that week in order to complete the lab work that is required for an AP science course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry and the approval of Mrs. Van Metre, room 110B. Students are placed in AP Environmental Science based on their demonstrated ability to do college-level work. Previous science teacher recommendations and results of PSAT/SAT will be considered. Students will also need to have completed Algebra II or be enrolled in the course concurrently.

NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE A PACKET OF COURSE WORK OVER THE SUMMER (THE EQUIVALENT OF ABOUT FIVE HOURS OF READING AND STUDYING), PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK THROUGH ASSESSMENT DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL AS WELL AS ON THE MIDTERM EXAM.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AI: Students in the lab-based course will focus on specific aspects in the study of ecology (the interaction of organisms with each other and with their environments). This course will include research on natural resources, ecological systems, environmental biomes as well as problems facing environmentalists today. Prerequisites:  Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry and approval of the current science teacher.

MARINE BIOLOGY AI: This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of marine ecology and the ocean environment through lecture, labs, and hands on activities. Specific topics will include primary and secondary production, geology and geography of the ocean, estuaries, intertidal communities, coral reefs, pelagic and deep sea communities, impacts of humans, biology of life in the ocean, and conservation. Course presentation will be varied and interactive, including hands on activities, labs, field work, projects and multimedia presentations. Material will be presented in a variety of ways that will require student preparation and participation. The dynamic nature of marine systems will provide learning opportunities for all of us. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry and approval of the current science teacher.

MARINE BIOLOGY AII: This course is designed to provide students with a basic introduction to marine ecosystems and the marine life found within these ecosystems. Topics will include introductory oceanography, tides and tidal communities, coral reefs, vertebrates, invertebrate life, and environmental concerns. Course presentation will be varied including hands on activities, projects and multimedia presentations. The dynamic nature of marine systems will provide learning opportunities for all of us. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry and approval of the current science teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AII: This course is a lab-based course with MANDATORY nighttime labs for skygazing. The class requires between two and four nighttime labs a semester. Most of the nighttime labs will take place on campus; however, one of the labs second semester will take place at the College of Charleston. In collaboration with the College of Charleston, we will have access to their observation deck atop the Rita Liddy Hollings Science Center. Topics of study include our solar system, exoplanets, star formation and death, observable universe, and possibilities of life. Students will participate in hands-on labs, lectures, Socratic seminars on relevant topics, and proper management and use of telescopes. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry and approval of the current science teacher. Environmental Science is recommended, but not required. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

 

Social Studies

WORLD HISTORY H: This course is a survey covering modern times in both the Western and non-Western worlds. Topics include the following: the Renaissance and the era of Discovery; the growth of democracy and nationalism, the Industrial Revolution; the two World Wars and the post –war conflicts such as the Cold War. The developments and influence of various religions and philosophies as well as political, social, and economic systems are examined in context. Prerequisites: Recommendation for the Honors level by the placement committee.

WORLD HISTORY AI: This course is a survey covering modern times in both the Western and non-Western worlds. Topics include the following: the Renaissance and the era of Discovery; the growth of democracy and nationalism, the Industrial Revolution; the two World Wars and the post –war conflicts such as the Cold War. The developments and influence of various religions and philosophies as well as political, social, and economic systems are examined in context. Prerequisites: Recommendation for the AI level by the placement committee.

WORLD HISTORY AII: This course is a survey covering modern times in both the Western and non-Western worlds. Topics include the following: the Renaissance and the era of Discovery; the growth of democracy and nationalism, the Industrial Revolution; the two World Wars and the post –war conflicts such as the Cold War. The developments and influence of various religions and philosophies as well as political, social, and economic systems are examined in context. Emphasis is placed on developing organizational, note taking, and study skills. Prerequisites: Recommendation for the AII level by the placement committee

AP U.S. HISTORY: Students will investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change. Students also make connections among historical developments in different times and places.  This course covers the content of two semesters in college-level history.  Prerequisites: The student must be a junior and have the approval of his or her former World History teacher or Ms. Humphreys (224A).

NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN AP U.S. HISTORY MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE A PACKET OF COURSE WORK OVER THE SUMMER (THE EQUIVALENT OF ABOUT FIVE HOURS OF READING AND STUDYING), PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK THROUGH ASSESSMENT DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL AS WELL AS ON THE MIDTERM EXAM.

U.S. HISTORY AI: This course is an in-depth survey of American history spanning the colonial period to the twentieth century. Prerequisites: The student must be a junior and have the approval of his or her former World History teacher or Ms. Humphreys (253A).  

U.S. HISTORY AII: This course is a survey of American history spanning the colonial period to the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the development of the note-taking and study skills needed for higher education. Prerequisites: The student must be a junior and have the approval of his or her former World History teacher or Ms. Humphreys (253A).  

*AP US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS: This fast-paced semester course will be offered in the fall to provide an in-depth study of the national government, focusing on foundational documents and landmark Supreme Court cases. It includes a study of political parties, interest groups, civil liberties civil rights, and federalism, as well as the powers and limits of the three branches of government. Students will use textual evidence to support positions and analyze data to arrive at conclusions. The course is designed to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement exam in U.S. Government and Politics. Students will be provided with review materials and study times with the teacher during spring semester in preparation for the AP exam. Prerequisites: The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current social studies teacher.

NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN AP US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE A PACKET OF COURSE WORK OVER THE SUMMER (THE EQUIVALENT OF ABOUT FIVE HOURS OF READING AND STUDYING), PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK THROUGH ASSESSMENT DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL AS WELL AS ON THE FINAL EXAM IN DECEMBER.

*US GOVERNMENT H: This semester course provides an in-depth study of the national government and the policy-making process. It includes a study of the role of interest groups, political parties and the media, as well as the impact of federalism and the separation of powers, on the political process. Students will study civil liberties and civil rights and the changing interpretations of how they have evolved over the course of US history. Prerequisites: The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current social studies teacher.

*US GOVERNMENT AI: This semester course provides a study of the national government, including its philosophical origins, the powers and limits of each branch of government, the nature and impact of federalism, as well as the role of interest groups and political parties in the US political system. Students will also study the civil liberties and civil rights of citizens. Prerequisites: The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current social studies teacher.

*US GOVERNMENT AII: This semester course provides a study of the national government. It includes a study of the three branches of government, the two-party system, and the impact of interest groups on policy-making, as well civil liberties and civil rights. Prerequisites: The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current social studies teacher.

*AP MACROECONOMICS: AP Macroeconomics is a fast-paced, challenging, one-semester course offered in the spring that begins with the study of fundamental economic concepts such as scarcityopportunity costsproduction possibilities, specialization, comparative advantagedemandsupply, and price determination. The major focus shifts quickly to the United States’ economy as a whole. Topics include the measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, fiscal and monetary policy, and international economics and growth. Prerequisites: Due to the challenging nature of AP Macroeconomics, teacher recommendation is required. Those students taking APUSH will need the recommendation and signature of Mrs. McMillan. Students currently taking A1 U.S. History will need to see Mrs. Martini for admittance into the class.

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN AP MACROECONOMICS WILL BE REQUIRED TO READ NAKED ECONOMICS AND ANSWER A SERIES OF QUESTIONS RELATED TO THE BOOK IN PREPARATION FOR THE COURSE DURING CHRISTMAS BREAK.

*ECONOMICS H: This semester course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics. However, it places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. Prerequisites: The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current social studies teacher.

*ECONOMICS AI: This semester course introduces the principles that form the basis of the American economic system. It involves a study of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Prerequisites: The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current social studies teacher.

*ECONOMICS AII: This semester course introduces the basic economic principles underlying the American economic system. It involves some study of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Prerequisites: The student must be a senior and have the approval of the current social studies teacher.

*LAW EDUCATION AI: This semester course is an in-depth study of the American criminal justice system. Special emphasis will be placed on how the justice system could impact the lives of students. Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore, junior, or senior and have the approval of his or her World History teacher. The student must have a passing average in his or her current or previous history class to gain approval. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*LAW EDUCATION AII: This semester course is an introductory study of the American criminal justice system. Special emphasis will be placed on how the justice system could impact the lives of students. Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore, junior, or senior and have the approval of his or her World History teacher. The student must have a passing average in his or her current or previous history class to gain approval. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

PSYCHOLOGY AI: This year long course introduces students to the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include the brain and behavior, developmental stages of the human life span, states of consciousness, abnormal psychology, learning theories, personality and gender traits, as well as substance abuse and addiction. Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore, junior, or senior. Sophomores and juniors must have approval from their World History teacher. Seniors must have approval from their current U.S. History teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

AP PSYCHOLOGY: This is a one-year introductory course, designed to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that of a college level psychology course, and to prepare students for the AP Psychology exam. This course is designed to allow students to experience an in-depth exploration of human thought processes and behavior through various psychological perspectives, including the psychoanalytic, biological, cognitive, behavioral, sociocultural, and humanistic schools of thought. Prerequisites: The student must be a sophomore, junior, or senior. Rising juniors must have the approval of their former World History teacher. Rising seniors must have approval of their current U.S. History teacher.

NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN AP PSYCHOLOGY MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE A PACKET OF COURSE WORK OVER THE SUMMER (THE EQUIVALENT OF ABOUT FIVE HOURS OF READING AND STUDYING), PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK THROUGH ASSESSMENT DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL AS WELL AS ON THE MIDTERM EXAM.

*THE HOLOCAUST H: This semester course will focus on acts of genocide throughout history with a primary focus on the Holocaust. The students will examine how a civilized Western democracy in the 20th century comes to be governed by a despotic regime. Students will analyze the economic, social, and political factors that allowed such a regime to emerge. They will also study the influence of literature, art, music, and propaganda of the period. Finally, the students will learn about other acts of genocide and analyze how individuals can make a difference. Students will be part of the Remember Program that is sponsored by the Jewish Community Center. Prerequisite: The student must be a sophomore, junior, or senior. Rising sophomores and juniors must have the approval of their current or former World History teacher. Rising seniors must have the approval of their current U.S. History teacher

Technology & Business

*EXPLORING COMPUTER SCIENCE AI: This semester course is designed to introduce students to the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand the tools and languages that might be used to solve particular problems. Students in this course will develop problem solving and critical thinking skills that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. They will be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers, data analysis, web design, and programming, as well as societal and ethical issues in computing. Prerequisites: None. (No teacher signature required.) This course is open only to students who have NOT taken Business Applications.

*INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING AI: In this semester course, students enter a world of computer science by learning how to create animations, computer games, and interactive projects. Using a graphical programming language, students learn fundamental programming concepts such as variables, loops, conditional statements, and event handling. Students learn how to use logic and computer code to think creatively. The course will show students how to make and import objects, create audio recordings, and use them to develop interactive projects. Students do no need to purchase any software or textbook. Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (No teacher signature required.)

*FUNDAMENTALS OF WEB DESIGN AI In this semester course, students will be introduced to the design, creation, and maintenance of websites. Students will learn the history of the website, how to create and maintain quality web pages, and they will learn about web design standards, and how to create and manipulate images. The course progresses from introductory work on web design and coding to a culminating project in which students design and develop their own personal website. Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (No teacher signature required.)

*ENTREPRENEURSHIP AI: In this introductory business course, students learn the basics of planning and launching their own successful business. Whether they want to start their own money-making business or create a non-profit to help others, this course helps students develop the core skills they need to be successful. They learn how to come up with new business ideas, attract investors, market their business, and manage expenses. (This class does NOT count towards the computer credit requirement.) Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors with approval from Mr. Croghan, room 206B. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class. approval of

World Languages

SPANISH I H: This course is a study of basic grammar, vocabulary, and Spanish/Hispanic culture with emphasis on conversation and other basic skills taught at an accelerated level. Greater emphasis is placed on aural/ oral comprehension and early grammar applications. Prerequisites: Recommendation for the Honors level by placement committee.

SPANISH I AI: This course is a study of basic grammar and vocabulary with emphasis on conversation and the other basic skills. Verb study, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed. Spanish/Hispanic culture and geography are also introduced on this level. Prerequisites: Recommendation for the AI level by placement committee. Current BE students who are interested in taking this course in lieu of an additional year of French need approval from their current language teacher.

SPANISH I AII: This course is a study of basic vocabulary, grammar, and conversation. It includes basic skills in verbal study, speaking, reading, and writing. Spanish/Hispanic culture is introduced. Prerequisites: Recommendation for the AII level by placement committee. Current BE students who have not taken a language yet must get approval from Ms. Rosebrock, room 113A. *Note that students recommended for AII level may opt to wait until sophomore year to begin their World Language studies.

SPANISH II H: This course covers more in-depth work than the Spanish II AI. It includes detailed verb study and grammar applications at an accelerated level as well as the study of the Spanish/Hispanic culture. Emphasis is placed on oral proficiency. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish I and recommendation of placement committee or the approval of current language teacher.

SPANISH II AI: This course involves a review and extension of grammar, pronunciation, reading, writing skills and conversational Spanish with the study of Spanish/ Hispanic culture. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish I and recommendation of placement committee or the approval of current language teacher.  

SPANISH II AII: This course is a review and extension of Introductory Spanish. New grammar applications are introduced as well as verb tenses and Spanish/ Hispanic culture. Speaking and writing skills are further developed along with pronunciation and reading skills. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish I and approval of current language teacher.

SPANISH III H: This course is a more advanced study of vocabulary and grammatical structures with a greater emphasis on writing skills than the Spanish 3A1. The class is conducted largely in Spanish and students are expected to build on their comprehension and conversation skills. Students will study Spanish culture and complete cross curricular activities with the inclusion of authentic resources. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish II and approval of current language teacher.

SPANISH III AI: This course is a concentrated review and extension of grammar with a greater emphasis on conversation and composition than Spanish II AI. Emphasis is also placed on application of thematic vocabulary and grammar. The culture of Spanish speaking countries is also studied. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish II and approval of current language teacher.

SPANISH III AII: Verb tenses and grammar applications are further developed with an emphasis placed on application of thematic vocabulary in writing and conversation. Culture of the Spanish speaking countries is also studied. This course completes the AII language program. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish II and approval of current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

SPANISH IV HThis course is an accelerated comprehensive review of grammar. In-depth study of Spanish/Hispanic literature is included in various genres. This course is designed to prepare students for AP Spanish. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish III and approval of current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

SPANISH IV AI: This course is a comprehensive review of grammar with emphasis on conversation and comprehension of spoken Spanish. The study of Spanish/Hispanic literature and civilization is included in various styles and genres. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish III and approval of current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE: This course is intended for those who have chosen to develop their proficiency for listening, reading, writing and speaking Spanish. It emphasizes aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition in various formal and informal styles. Emphasis is also placed on the use of Spanish for active communication. Students are prepared to take the Advanced Placement exam at the end of the year. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish IV and approval of current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student will is not permitted to drop the class. NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN AP SPANISH LANGUAGE  MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE A PACKET OF COURSE WORK OVER THE SUMMER (THE EQUIVALENT OF ABOUT FIVE HOURS OF READING AND STUDYING), PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK THROUGH ASSESSMENT DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL AS WELL AS ON THE MIDTERM EXAM.

FRENCH I AI: This course includes a thematic approach to French culture and vocabulary. Conversation skills are encouraged by using the vocabulary in a variety of interactions. Basic grammar skills are covered with an emphasis on verb study. This level also stresses speaking, reading, and writing.  The geography of France is introduced. Prerequisites: Recommendation for the AI level by placement committee. Current BE students who are interested in taking French I in lieu of an additional year of Spanish need approval from their current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

FRENCH I H: This course includes all materials covered in AI. However, the student does accelerated and in-depth work on the Honors level. Greater emphasis is placed in aural/oral comprehension. Prerequisites: Recommendation for the Honors level by placement committee. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

FRENCH II H: This course places emphasis on pronunciation, conversation, reading, and composition. It includes a review and further study of grammar, vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and the study of French and Francophone culture. Prerequisites: Successful completion of French I and recommendation of placement committee or the approval of current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

FRENCH II AI: This course includes further study of verb conjugations, grammar, pronunciation, reading, and conversational French as well as French culture. Prerequisites: Successful completion of French I and recommendation of placement committee or the approval of current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

FRENCH III H:  This course is a more advanced study of grammatical structures, with an emphasis on conversation and writing skills. The units are based on themes in French culture. Students are expected to speak mostly in French in class, except during grammar instruction. Prerequisites: Successful completion of French II and approval of current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

FRENCH III AI  This course includes a review of grammar, as well as an introduction to more advanced structures. Students practice conversing and writing in French. The units are based on themes in French culture. Prerequisites: Successful completion of French II and approval of current language teacher. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student is not permitted to drop the class.

*THE FRENCH-SPEAKING WORLD (LA FRANCOPHONIE) H-In this fall semester course, students learn about French-speaking communities around the world. Students are introduced to the products, practices, and perspectives of these communities through songs, movies, literary excerpts, news articles, and other suitable media. There will be a focus on writing and conversing. French grammar and vocabulary will be covered as necessary to communicate in the course. The course is taught almost exclusively in French. Prerequisites: Students must have completed or be currently enrolled in French 3 and be approved for Honors level work. Students who are concurrently enrolled in French 3 and one or both semester courses would be eligible to enroll in AP French upon the approval of the instructor.

*FRENCH CULTURE AND CONVERSATION H– In this spring semester course, students focus on spoken communication by conversing and presenting in French. Selected topics from French history, current events, and the personal interests of the students would be debated and explored through conversation and student presentations. The course is taught almost exclusively in French. Prerequisites: Students must have completed or be currently enrolled in French 3 and be approved for Honors level work. Note that Students would be permitted to take the fall or spring course by itself. Students who are concurrently enrolled in French 3 and one or both semester courses would be eligible to enroll in AP French upon the approval of the instructor.

AP FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE: This course is intended for those who have chosen to refine their proficiency for reading, writing, and conversing in French.  Units are based on novels, songs, current events, and movies from France and other French-speaking countries.  Students speak only in French during class.  This course incorporates grammar review and expansion of vocabulary.  Students are prepared to take the Advanced Placement exam at the end of the year. Prerequisites: Any student successfully completing of French IV and recommended for AP. Note that if a student signs up for this class as a first choice or an alternate, and the enrollment in the class is fewer than ten, the student will is not permitted to drop the class. NOTE THAT STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE AP MUST BE WILLING TO COMPLETE A PACKET OF COURSE WORK OVER THE SUMMER (THE EQUIVALENT OF ABOUT FIVE HOURS OF READING AND STUDYING), PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. STUDENTS WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THIS WORK THROUGH ASSESSMENT DURING THE FIRST COUPLE OF WEEKS OF SCHOOL AS WELL AS ON THE MIDTERM EXAM.

Special Offerings

*OPTIONS SCHOLARS AI: This semester course is designed to enable students to develop peer relationships while serving as academic peer mentors for students with moderate cognitive disabilities. While enrolled in the course, students will learn about various types of disabilities, different learning styles, and effective instructional techniques. Prerequisites: Students must be in the 11th or 12th grade and have the approval of Ms. Common, room 115A. Good attendance and discipline records are essential for this course. Note that students may NOT list this course as an alternate without receiving approval from Ms. Common.

*OPTIONS SCHOLARS II AI: This semester course is designed to allow students to continue to develop peer relationships while serving as academic peer mentors for students with intellectual disabilities. While enrolled in the course, students will participate in reflective journal exercises, increase leadership skills, and develop effective instructional techniques. Prerequisites: Options Scholars I and the approval of Ms. Common, room 115A. Good attendance and discipline records are essential for this course. Note that students may NOT list this course as an alternate without receiving approval from Ms. Common. 

*PERSONAL FINANCE AI: This semester course is designed to educate the student on the importance of personal financial responsibility. It will cover topics such as goals and decision making, careers and planning, budgeting, saving and investing, credit and debt, banking services, and risk protection. (This class does NOT count towards the computer credit requirement.) Prerequisites: This course is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (No teacher signature required.)

*YEARBOOK PRODUCTION (Semester): This semester course allows students to plan, produce, market, and distribute a product for the entire school community. Topics include current design trends as well as Yeartech and journalistic techniques. Editing, analytical, communication, and leadership skills are also stressedPrerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who and have gone through an application process and received the approval of Mr. Traeger, Room 207B.  Also, every yearbook student is strongly recommended to attend a 2-3-day summer workshop with the BE yearbook staff. In order to list this course as an alternate, a student must meet all prerequisites described above.

YEARBOOK PRODUCTION AI (Year): Students who want to enroll in a whole year of Yearbook Production will use this course number. Students plan, produce, market, and distribute a product for the entire school community. Topics include current design trends as well as Yeartech and journalistic techniques. Editing, analytical, communication, and leadership skills are also stressed. Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who and have gone through an application process and received the approval of Mr. Traeger, Room 207B.  Also, every yearbook student is strongly recommended to attend a 2-3-day summer workshop with the BE yearbook staff. In order to list this course as an alternate, a student must meet all prerequisites described above.

YEARBOOK EDITORS H: This course allows students to direct the planning, production, marketing, and distribution of the Yearbook for the entire school community. Topics include current design trends as well as Yeartech and journalistic techniques. Editing, communication, and leadership skills are required to be editors. Editors receive Honors quality points for the course described above. Editors are required to attend the summer workshop prior to the year they will serve as editor. Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have gone through an application process and received the approval of Mr. Traeger, Room 207B. Editors are required to attend the summer workshop prior to the year they will serve as editor.

*STUDENT OFFICE ASSISTANT: Seniors who have all their required courses for graduation and who do not want to take seven academic subjects may serve as aides in the school office or in the library for one period per day for a semester. Students will be assigned a location for the entire semester by the principal. The Director of School and College Counseling, Ms. Gastaldi, must approve these students. Note: This is not a credit activity. *

*FALL LEARNING LAB (AI) *SPRING LEARNING LAB (AI): Students will learn to self-advocate and will learn how to organize academic materials, as well as plan long-term projects. They will learn study strategies that incorporate their own personal learning styles and that take into account the subject being studied. A learning specialist will work with students on an individual basis, and a math tutor will assist students with math skills. Students who qualify for Learning Lab may earn a half credit for each semester up to a maximum of two credits. No student may earn more than two credits in Learning Lab.  Prerequisites: Students must have a documented learning difference and approval of the school’s accommodations coordinator. Parent/student must apply for academic support. Contact Mrs. Lusby, (clusby@behs.com) to apply or receive more information. 

*FALL STUDY LAB / *SPRING STUDY LAB- (No credit): Students have access to a learning specialist and math tutor if in need of a significant amount of assistance with organization and study strategies in junior and senior classes. Prerequisites: Students must have a documented learning difference and recommendation from the school’s accommodations coordinator. Study lab is for those students who have been in Learning Lab in previous years and have earned two Carnegie units of credit.

*FALL OR SPRING STUDY HALL (No credit):The purpose of a study hall is for students to work on tasks for their courses. Students are responsible for bringing academic materials to the study hall classroom in order to be ready to spend the period working and studying. In order to foster an environment where everyone can focus and be productive, study halls are quiet, and normally, students may only leave the room if they have previously arranged to so before the study hall period. Prerequisites: No teacher signature required. Note that students must have six classes for credit in grades 9, 10, and 11 and five classes in grade 12.

*FALL FREE PERIOD (SENIORS ONLY)—No teacher signature required.

*SPRING FREE PERIOD (SENIORS ONLY)—No teacher signature required

Options Program

THE OPTIONS PROGRAM

The Options program is designed to provide an inclusive educational experience for students with moderate developmental or intellectual disabilities. Students who complete the Options course of study satisfactorily will receive a “Certificate of Achievement” and will participate in all commencement activities.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR OPTIONS STUDENTS

In order to participate in commencement exercises and receive a “Certificate of Achievement,” a student enrolled in the Options Program must pass all required subjects (see below), have a good discipline record, attend graduation practice, and be an active participant at Baccalaureate Mass.

REQUIRED CREDITS:

Theology – 4

English – 4

Mathematics – 4

Science – 3

U.S. History – 1

US Government – ½

Economics – ½

World History – 1

Physical Education – 2

Fine Arts – 1

Additional Elective – 3

Total credits required – 24

 

Promotion standards

A student who fails a course will be required to repeat the course or participate in a credit recovery program.

 

Academic probation

A student experiencing academic difficulties may be placed on academic probation and must meet the terms of the probation in order to remain in the program.

Students in the Options program are included in many standard classes daily, such as theology, history, science, and fine arts. The course of study for each student is determined by lead Options teacher in consultation with the parents.